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December 2020 ∙ Issue #237

December with Clearsky Accounting


ClearSky Accounting

with ClearSky Accounting


A lot of people who were made redundant, perhaps because of COVID, are starting or preparing to start up their own business and have decided life needs to be lived how they want it, rather than at someone else’s command.


If that sounds like you, now is the time to contact an accountant to make sure you get your “ducks in a row”. Don’t wait until after 31 March and then find that your business set up could have been better. We are just moving into our new premises at 10 Albert Street Pukekohe and for those who travel that way you might have seen us beside the new crèche. We have space for new clients; please give us a call if you need help to sort your accounting woes. Remember you are not starting up your dream just to spend nights stressing over your paperwork. Our phone number is 292-2114 and we would love to help you.

A lot of people who were made redundant, perhaps because of COVID, are starting or preparing to start up their own business and have decided life needs to be lived how they want it, rather than at someone else’s command. If that sounds like you, now is the time to contact an accountant to make sure you get your “ducks in a row”. Don’t wait until after 31 March and then find that your business set up could have been better. We are just moving into our new premises at 10 Albert Street Pukekohe and for those who travel that way you might have seen us beside the new crèche. We have space for new clients; please give us a call if you need help to sort your accounting woes. Remember you are not starting up your dream just to spend nights stressing over your paperwork. Our phone number is 292-2114 and we would love to help you.

While we hope that the worst of COVID and the flu season is now over, we still need to be aware of the importance of complying with employees’ sick leave rights and knowing their legal obligations. During all alert levels employment health and safety laws still apply.

For companies employing staff, all employees (including part-time and casual) have the right to 5 days' sick leave if they meet one of the conditions below:

  • 6 months’ current continuous employment with the same employer, or
  • worked for the employer for 6 months for an average of 10 hours per week, and
  • at least one hour in every week or 40 hours in every month.

Sick leave can be used if your employee, members of their immediate family or dependants are sick or injured.

On the anniversary of the first 6 months, employees are then entitled to an extra 5 days for every year of employment. This can accumulate up to 20 days. These rights are not pro-rated. Even if your employee works 3 days a week, they will be entitled to 5 days’ sick leave after the first 6 months and so on.

You can offer more than the minimum 5 days. Frankly giving more than the minimum sick leave can help attract skilled employees, and makes sure that sick employees don’t come to work and spread illness, therefore reducing your business overall productivity. Any extra entitlement however should be written in the employment agreement.

Sick leave cannot be cashed-up or be part of any final payment when an employee leaves, unless it is agreed as part of the employment agreement.

Breaches of health and safety or employment laws can result in serious penalties from labour or health and safety inspectors.

You do not have to give your employees paid time-off work to visit the doctor or dentist unless their employment agreement says so. Your employees can ask to use sick leave, annual leave, unpaid leave, special leave or time in lieu. Some businesses allow 2 or 3 paid (or unpaid) hours for these situations.

If your employee has been absent for 3 or more days (including weekends) you can ask for a medical certificate. If you want a certificate for less than 3 days, you can ask for one but you must pay for the doctor's visit.

Payment for sick leave is only made when it is for a day your employee would have worked if they were not sick. It's at the rate they would be paid on the day they were sick i.e. relevant daily pay (or their average daily pay where applicable).

The above information about sick leave comes from the Employment New Zealand website which has comprehensive information about employment rights and obligations so do take a look at their website for further information: www.employment.govt.nz


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elocal Digital Edition – December 2020 (#237)

elocal Digital Edition
December 2020 (#237)